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Geology in the Gorge - Rock Climbing

OVERVIEW

From the Himalayas to the deepest, darkest depths of the Mariana Trench, humans have been fascinated for centuries with how our planet came to be and what makes it “tick.”

With such a revealing specimen in our own backyard, the New River Gorge is the subject of ACE’s hands-on geology curriculum. The first half of the day includes interactive lessons that examine the erosion and evolution that has exposed formations and our planets geological character in this thousand-foot gorge. Students learn the natural history of the New River Gorge, the factors that cause change and how geology affects ecosystems and economies.

Part two of our day takes on a very different sort of discovery. Students have the opportunity to climb the very cliffs our planet spent millions of years compressing into rock. It’s a tactile experience that drives home how our planet seems so unchanging but is in fact evolving all the time.  This day is customizable for grades 9-12.

Objectives / Understandings:

  • Explore the formation of observable landforms in the New River Gorge
  • Discover how geological characteristics of an area influence what lives there
  • Recognize factors that cause change within the system
  • Explore prehistoric life by hunting for and observing fossils
  • Research renewable and nonrenewable energy sources

 Essential Questions/ Guiding Questions:

  • What are the parts of this landscape?
  • How did they come to be?
  • Are they changing?
  • Are geology and ecology related?
  • What fossils can be found in this landscape?
  • What are the pros and cons of renewable and nonrenewable energy sources?

Activity Descriptions:

Story of the New River Gorge – Students will learn how the New River Gorge came to be by acting out its geologic history.
Dynamic Lithosphere Game – An active vocabulary review game that highlights plate tectonics and fossil formation processes.
Fossil Hunting – Explore the past by finding fossils that formed 300 million years ago.  Students will predict what life was like when these fossils were living creatures.
Soil Pits – Digging soil pits is a fun way to see how ecosystems are formed from the ground up. Students will explore how geology affects all life in the New River Gorge.  
Plant study – Get to know some of the most ancient plants on the planet. In this study of ferns and club mosses, students will become familiar with the plant families that form coal.
Energy Debate – Coal is one of West Virginia’s biggest economic resources. Students will learn and debate about using renewable versus nonrenewable resources and their affects on humans.
Rock climbing – Using features formed by our moving earth, students will make their way up beginner climbing routes. They will discover why people come from all over the world to climb the unique sandstone of the New River Gorge.

ITINERARY

Full Day Itinerary:

 Meet at Check-in Area:  8:30 am
 Depart:  9:00 am
 Morning Discussion at Concho Rim Overlook:  9:15 am

          - Story of the New River Gorge
          - Fossil Hunting
          - Dynamic Lithosphere Game
          - Soil Pits

 Drive to Climber’s Paradise:  11:45 am
 Lunch:  12:00 pm
 Plant Study and Energy Use Debate:  12:30 pm
 Rock Climbing:  1:45 pm
 Recap & Return:  4:45 pm

*Lunch at the river take-out
Please note itinerary for the day may change based due to weather conditions.


Rates:

Rate:                 $89 per person
Available Mon-Fri, Jan 1-Jun 15 and Aug 15-Dec 31
Designed for students in grades 9-12

MORE INFO

Links

USGS background info:
http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/www/geology/geology.htm
Great overview of NRG geology!
http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/parks/neri/
WV Geologic Survey Educational Materials:
http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/www/geoeduc/geoeduc.htm
West Virginia 300 Millions Years Ago:
http://www.geocraft.com/WVFossils/Article1.html
Carboniferious Period explanation:
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/carboniferous/carboniferous.php
Plant Fossils of West Virginia:
http://www.geocraft.com/WVFossils/Articles1.html
Geology Illustrations:
http://www.geo.wvu.edu/~renton/Geology101/index.html


BACKGROUND

Soils
Soil surveys have been completed for Fayette and Raleigh counties (Gorman and Espy 1975) and Mercer and Summers counties (Sponaugle et al. 1984). Pauley and Pauley (no date) described soils near Gauley River National Recreation Area based on Gorman and Espy (1975). An updated soil survey is currently being performed for Fayette and Raleigh Counties (Tony Jenkins, Natural Resource Conservation Service, personal communication 2001).

Ehlke et al. (1982, 1983) summarized the above soil surveys that include the three parks. Soils place New River Gorge National River (Dekalb-Rock outcrop) and Gauley River National Recreation Area (Dekalb-Gilpin-Enist and the Gilpin-Ernest-Buckhanon) in the Eastern Allegheny Plateau and Mountains Land Resource Area (Austin 1965, U. S. Department of Agriculture 1981). Soils in Bluestone National Scenic River (Gilpin- Dekalb) place it in the Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys Land Resource Area.

Based on existing published information, moderately deep silt loams or sandy loams dominate the valley bottoms and lower slopes in the three parks. These soils are well drained and very stony. Most of the soils lie on very steep (40 to 70%) slopes and are of low to moderate fertility. Derived from shale and sandstone, they are well suited for tree growth, but have severe erosion potential when destabilized. The upper slopes, ridge tops, and tributaries contain sandstone outcrops and broken cliffs that are from 1 foot to over 100 feet high. Brown sandy loams are also found on the ridge tops. The updated soil survey of these areas is expected to provide more details about these forested landscapes than was included in the older, more agronomic-oriented publications. This information is expected to be available between 2005 and 2007 (Tony Jenkins, Natural Resources Conservation Service, personal communication 2001).
Source: http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/parks/neri/


Test
Answers
WV Content Standards


Curriculum Designer

Jackie Gallimore

Jackie Gallimore
M.S. Natural Resources with emphasis in Environmental Education – University of Idaho
B.A. Psychology with minors in Biology and Outdoor Leadership – Western Kentucky University


Experience:  Trip Leader, ACE Whitewater, Minden, WV.  Program Coordinator, New Discoveries Enrichment Program, Moscow, ID.  Environmental Education Field Instructor, McCall Outdoor Science School, McCall, ID.  Environmental Education Intern, Manzano Day School, Jemez Spring, NM. Environmental Education Intern, Mammoth Cave National Park, Mammoth Cave, KY.  Ropes Course Facilitator, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY.  Certified Outdoor Leader, Wilderness Education Association.  Leave No Trace Trainer.  Project Wet, Learning Tree, and Wild Certified.

 

 

Ecology Expedition

OVERVIEW

Zip-lining may be fun, but it can also be used to explore the ecosystems that exist along the rim of the New River Gorge. Incorporating curriculum-standard-based activities, teachers will be able to enrich textbook lessons through a hands-on science day. During this full day trip, students learn how plants, animals and non-living factors play critical roles in their environment. Among other activities that teach self-awareness and human impacts, students will participate in an ongoing national project to identify and record the biodiversity of the New River Gorge. This day is customizable for grades 9-12.

Objectives / Understandings:

  • Learn how certain plants and animals adapt to and change their environment
  • Learn how parts of an ecosystem are interrelated
  • Practice critical thinking skills by debating an environmental issue
  • Learn to identify common plant, tree and animal species on the ACE property
  • Meaningfully contribute to scientific understanding by participating in a citizen science project
  • Learn about dichotomous keys and practice using them

 Essential Questions/ Guiding Questions:

  • What is an ecosystem?
  • How are abiotic factors, plants and animals interrelated?
  • What plant and animal species can be found in the New River Gorge?
  • How do some plant and animal species adapt to their environment?
  • Is climate change affecting local flora and fauna?
  • How can laymen contribute to science?

Activity Descriptions:

Carrying Capacity – An active game that demonstrates the dynamic nature of populations within an ecosystem.
Energy Pipeline – This activity demonstrates the concept that energy is lost as you move from plants to herbivores to carnivores in the food chain. It shows students that it is more “energetically expensive” to be higher up on the food chain.  
Zip-lining – Students will have the opportunity to view different ecosystems while traveling by zip-line. They will also learn that zip-lines were first used by scientists to help them travel through their test sites. There are 5 zips and 2 sky bridges included in the day’s activities.
Citizen Science Project – Students will participate in a project to plot the biodiversity of the New River Gorge. Using iNaturalist (a citizen science database) they will classify and record specimens to be uploaded. Students will then complete a simple worksheet that demonstrates what can be done with the information they have collected.
Beaver Ecology – Students will participate in a lesson that demonstrates the effect beavers have on the surrounding environment and how they have adapted genetically to it. We’ll end the day by building a beaver – one student will be selected to represent our beaver, adding accessories that represent the beavers survival mechanisms.
The Great Debate – Students will practice their debate skills by participating in a discussion about one of three topics: invasive species, recreational use of land or climate change (or choose your own).

ITINERARY

Full Day Itinerary:

 Meet at Check-in Area:  8:30 am
 Depart:  9:00 am
 Introduction Activities:  9:15 am
 Citizen Science Project:  10:00 am
 Lunch:  12:30 pm
 Zip Line:  12:30 pm
 Debate:  3:00 pm
 Core Lessons:  1:00 pm
 Beaver Ecology:  3:45 pm
 Recap & Return:  4:30 pm

*Lunch at the river take-out
Please note itinerary for the day may change based due to weather conditions.


Rates:

Rate:                 $89 per person
Available Mon-Fri, Jan 1-Jun 15 and Aug 15-Dec 31
Designed for students in grades 9-12

MORE INFO

Links

National Park Service’s New River Gorge – Start exploring our ecosystem!
http://www.nps.gov/neri/index.htm
West Virginia Division of Natural Resources Publications:
http://www.wvdnr.gov/publications/publications.shtm
iNaturalist – A citizen science database for recording observation about the natural world.
http://www.inaturalist.org/


Test
Answers
WV Content Standards


Curriculum Designer

Jackie Gallimore

Jackie Gallimore
M.S. Natural Resources with emphasis in Environmental Education – University of Idaho
B.A. Psychology with minors in Biology and Outdoor Leadership – Western Kentucky University


Experience:  Trip Leader, ACE Whitewater, Minden, WV.  Program Coordinator, New Discoveries Enrichment Program, Moscow, ID.  Environmental Education Field Instructor, McCall Outdoor Science School, McCall, ID.  Environmental Education Intern, Manzano Day School, Jemez Spring, NM. Environmental Education Intern, Mammoth Cave National Park, Mammoth Cave, KY.  Ropes Course Facilitator, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY.  Certified Outdoor Leader, Wilderness Education Association.  Leave No Trace Trainer.  Project Wet, Learning Tree, and Wild Certified.

 

Wet & Wild H2O - An Exploration in Hydrology

OVERVIEW

A journey through the New River Gorge is a journey through time that began over 300 million years ago. That’s when the youngest rocks of the gorge were formed and water and erosion began to carve this thousand-foot canyon. Considered one of the oldest rivers in the world, it makes an ideal “classroom” for exploring first-hand how the waters on our planet cycle through the environment and sustain life as we know it.    

As part of this full-day hydrology study, students will raft the New River Gorge, a section appropriate to their age range. In this floating classroom, students will learn about how water, the landscape and human activity are interconnected. They will explore why water is a precious resource and how they can become part of the solution to its preservation by participating in a stream survey. This day is customizable for grades 9-12.

Objectives / Understandings:

  • Review the water cycle and understand why water is a precious resource
  • Understand what a watershed is and how human activity affects water resources
  • Learn how the New River Gorge was formed
  • Learn the names of water features and how they are created
  • Practice debating skills by discussing river damming from the perspective of different users and their needs
  • Complete a steam survey

 Essential Questions/ Guiding Questions:

  • How do humans affect water resources?
  • How does water affect all other parts of an ecosystem?
  • Why should we use water wisely?
  • How can we tell if a water source is healthy?

Activity Descriptions:

Drop in the Bucket - A Project Wet activity demonstrating that of all the water on the planet, only .01% of it is potable (drinkable).
Water Cycle Dramatization - Students will review the water cycle by playing roles in a narrated drama.
River Anatomy - An active game where students learn the parts of the river including rapids, hydraulics, strainers and other river features.
Whitewater Rafting - Students will raft the New River (section determined by age of participants) while learning about how water helps form the landscape and watersheds.
Watersheds & the New River - As students descend through the New River Gorge, they will learn what makes a watershed and what part this river plays in its local drainage system.
To Dam or Not to Dam - A Project Wild Aquatic activity where students practice their debating skills using the topic of dams and water use.
Macro Mayhem - A high energy game where students become the macroinvertebrates they are studying in order to grasp the concept of how living organisms can indicate the health of an ecosystem.
Water Quality Survey - Students will have the opportunity to positively affect water resources and practice using the scientific method water survey that will be submitted to the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).

ITINERARY

Full Day Itinerary:

 Meet at Check-in Area:  7:00 am
 Depart for the River:  8:00 am
 Arrive at River:  8:30 am
 Introduction Activities:  8:45 am
 Snack Break:  9:30 am
 Whitewater Rafting:  9:45 am
 Lunch:  12:30 pm*
 Core Lessons:  1:00 pm
 Depart for ACE:  4:00 pm
 Recap at ACE:  4:30 pm

*Lunch at the river take-out
Please note itinerary for the day may change based due to weather conditions.


Rates:

Easy Whitewater:                $79 per person
Adventurous Whitewater:  $89 per person
Available Mon-Fri, Jan 1-Jun 15 and Aug 15-Dec 31
Designed for students in grades 9-12

MORE INFO

Links

National Park Service Watersheds Lesson Plan:
Additional materials teachers may want to use in their classroom.
http://www.nps.gov/neri/forteachers/upload/Ribbon%20of%20Life.pdf
New River Watershed:
Follow The New River from its origin in the mountains of North Carolina to the Gulf of Mexico.
http://www1.hollins.edu/classes/hesit/Journey%20of%20New%20River.pdf
River Introduction Video:
This video introduces the study of rivers.
http://youtu.be/jSL9nQb-ohM
Water Survey:
This is the water survey we will be using during the trip.
http://www.dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Documents/Surveys/Level1.pdf
Fishes of West Virginia Brochure:
http://www.wvdnr.gov/Wildlife/PDFFiles/fishbrochure.pdf
Department of Environmental Protection Educational Resources:
http://www.dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/Pages/default.aspx


Background information:

A Time to Fish
Spring and fall are the best times of the year to fish the New River. During these seasons, water temperatures are in transition between cold winter temperatures and warm summer temperatures. Most fish species are more active in cooler water and are more aggressively feeding during the spring and fall.

The best times of the day to fish are early morning and late evening. Most fish prey is much more active at these times; therefore, more fish are out feeding. Some species of fish feed at night, providing anglers an opportunity for night fishing.
Source: West Virginia DNR
 
What is a watershed?
A watershed is an area of land which drains (sheds) water into a stream or river. It is also known as a drainage basin. The system of streams that transports water, sediment and other materials from a watershed is called a drainage system.2 A watershed catches water that falls to the earth as precipitation; a drainage system channels the water and substances it carries to a common outlet.2

The watershed is the drainage basin of a river; the area through which all waters flow from their highest source before draining naturally to the sea.3 In the broader ecological sense, the term watershed includes not only the land and water but the mountains and forest, floodplains and valleys, as well as the communities of plants, animals and people who live there.3

A watershed is “that area of land . . . within which all living things are inextricably linked by their common water course and where, as humans settled, simple logic demanded that they become part of the community," John Wesley Powell.

Watersheds come in all sizes and shapes depending the topography or lay of the land. Each stream or river comprises a watershed (drainage basin) and is separated from other drainage basins by divides. Divides are the highest topographical points surrounding a stream or river causing water to drain into one stream or another. In every watershed, small streams flow into larger streams, which flow into river, lakes, and bays.6 Smaller streams are tributaries of a larger mainstream river and each is a sub-watershed of a larger watershed. For example, Piney and Glade creeks and the Greenbrier and Bluestone rivers are tributaries of the New River. They are also sub-watersheds of the New River watershed.
 
Hydrologic Cycle
Water is always on the move through the environment. The hydrologic cycle (water cycle) transports water between earth's watersheds, atmosphere and oceans.2 Rain falls upon the land and either runs off or soaks into the earth. Some of the rainwater is used by plants and animals in their life processes, some is used by humans, and some seeps underground to be stored or to reappear at another place to feed streams and rivers. Much of it goes back into the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration. Clouds form and, when conditions are ripe, the water is released to earth again in the form of rain or snow.4

The water cycle plays an important role in resupplying water to a watershed. It is the water cycle at work through evaporation, transpiration and precipitation that gives us the seemingly endless supply of water flowing within the New River and the New River watershed.
 
People and Watersheds
Every person on Earth lives within a watershed. A watershed is our home; it is where we are born and raised, where we learn and grow, and where we work and play. Our watershed contains mountains and plateaus, valleys and gorges, forests and wildlife, as well as our yard or farm and our neighbor's woodlot.

Within our watershed we are connected to everything and everybody. It is the watershed, itself, that connects us to one another. What we do and how we treat our watershed impacts the watershed and effect things downstream. Our daily activities can have a negative impact on the quality and quantity of water available to us and other living creatures for survival.

As water is shed off the land, the soil and plants collect large amounts of water. This process prevents flooding and makes more fresh water available by slowing its flow and allowing it to seep underground. When watershed lands are stripped of vegetation or replaced with concrete or houses, the watershed can no longer function to prevent floods and replenish the freshwater supply.5

Water moving through the hydrologic cycle picks up pollutants left behind by our activities. In the atmosphere pollutants from factory smokestacks, car exhaust and wood smoke are picked up as water vapor condenses and falls back to earth as acid rain. Rainwater runoff picks up surface pollutants from farms, streets and roadways, lawns and gardens, etc. Chemical spills, leaky landfills, and illegal dumps pollute water as it moves through the ground and re-surfaces in springs and streams.

Many watersheds have been altered as a result of human needs for water, food, recreation, transportation, manufactured goods, etc. These growing demands have led to unwise land uses within watersheds that have degraded water quality in our streams and rivers. Diking, damming and straightening of streams is done for flood control; streams are put into underground pipes to make more land available for homes, malls and roads; streams are polluted by dumping storm water runoff and factory and sewage treatment plant discharges.1

Everyone living in a watershed relies on the natural resources of the watershed to exist. All life forms (plants, animals, and humans) depend on water within the watershed they live in for survival.

A healthy watershed is vital for a healthy environment and economy. People must take a "watershed approach" to managing natural resources. This implies a way of looking at things as a whole, of seeing people and not just the trees but the forest, not just the river but all that creates and diminishes its flow.3 Therefore, maintaining the water quality of a watershed is essential to maintaining life on earth.

New River Watershed
The New River watershed covers a portion of three states — North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. With it's headwaters beginning on the western slopes of the Blue Ridge Mountains in North Carolina, the New River flows approximately 320 miles to the north. Along the way, many creeks, streams, and smaller rivers empty into the New River. These tributaries and the New River make up the drainage basin of the New River watershed.

The watershed encompasses an area of 6,964.6 square miles or approximately 4,457,369.5 acres. This is an area five and a half times larger than the state of Rhode Island, 3.4 times larger than Delaware, and 1.4 times larger than the state of Connecticut. There is approximately 9,000 miles of streams and rivers in the New River watershed. A total of 114 ponds and lakes, covering approximately 11,3289 acres of land, are within the watershed.

There are more than 165 cities, towns, and communities within the watershed. Towns with a population of 5,000-10,000 include Galax, Pulaski, and Wytheville, Virginia, and Oak Hill and Princeton, West Virginia. Boone, North Carolina, Radford and Christiansburg, Virginia, and Bluefield and Beckley, West Virginia, have populations of between 10,000-20,000. The city of Blacksburg, Virginia, has a population of over 30,000. There are two forks of the New River in North Carolina, the south fork bubbles from the ground near the community of Blowing Rock. The north fork of the New River begins along the North Carolina/Tennessee state line near Trade, Tennessee. Both the north and south forks meander through a rural mountain farm setting. At the North Carolina/Virginia border, the two forks join and continue a northeasterly flow across the valley of Virginia. North of Pulaski, Virginia, the river has cut several gaps through the ridge and valley province of the Appalachian Mountain region.

At the West Virginia/Virginia state line, the New River leaves the mountains behind and enters the Allegheny Plateau. Over time, the New River and its tributaries in West Virginia carved the landscape of the Allegheny Plateau into the deep meandering gorges as we see today. The New River watershed is a sub-watershed to a much larger drainage system. At Gauley Bridge, West Virginia, the New River joins with the Gauley River to form the Kanawha River, which flows into the Ohio River. At this point, Pt. Pleasant, West Virginia, the New River watershed becomes part of the Ohio River watershed. Eventually the Ohio River empties into the Mississippi River and the New River watershed becomes a part of the Mississippi River watershed, which empties into the Gulf of Mexico.
 
1. Firehock, Karen. Hands On Save Our Streams: The Save Our Stream Teacher's Manual. Gaithersburg, MD: The Izaak Walton League of America, 1994.
2. Murdoch, Tom, Martha Cheo, and Kate O'Laughin. Streamkeeper's Field Guide. Everett, WV: The Adopt-AStream Foundation, 1996.
3. Watershed. the TERRA (Toward Ecological Recovery & Regional Alliance) Bulletin, Thailand, July 1995.
4. Water Cycle and Water Supply. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, July 1967.
5. Environmental Action: Water Conservation. Menlo Park, CA: The Tides Center/E2: Environment and Education, 1998.
6. Adopt-A-Salmon Family: A Watershed Education Program for Middle School Students. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Source: http://www.nps.gov/neri/forteachers/upload/Ribbon%20of%20Life.pdf

The State of The Lower New River Watershed
See the report below for information about the state of the Lower New River Watershed. (The Executive Summary on page 6 is a good place to start).
http://www.npca.org/assets/pdf/NewRiverState_ScreenView_Full.pdf
 
Stream Survey Info
All images in this section were pulled from “West Virginia Save Our Streams Program Level-One Standard Operating Procedures Manual” (see link below) unless otherwise cited. http://www.dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Documents/SOPs/LevelOneSOPs.pdf

Test
Answers
WV Content Standards


Curriculum Designer

GetAttachment

Jackie Gallimore
M.S. Natural Resources with emphasis in Environmental Education – University of Idaho
B.A. Psychology with minors in Biology and Outdoor Leadership – Western Kentucky University


Experience:  Trip Leader, ACE Whitewater, Minden, WV.  Program Coordinator, New Discoveries Enrichment Program, Moscow, ID.  Environmental Education Field Instructor, McCall Outdoor Science School, McCall, ID.  Environmental Education Intern, Manzano Day School, Jemez Spring, NM. Environmental Education Intern, Mammoth Cave National Park, Mammoth Cave, KY.  Ropes Course Facilitator, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY.  Certified Outdoor Leader, Wilderness Education Association.  Leave No Trace Trainer.  Project Wet, Learning Tree, and Wild Certified.

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Church Trips

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West Virginia Faith Based Adventures

Faith Based Guide to AceAfter the long days of working for your community, your group may want to relax under the stars and enjoy the majesty of the great outdoors. We can do that. But the thrill -seekers looking for a rush may want to take advantage of a wide range of activities—whitewater rafting, rock climbing and zip-lining. We can do that, too! What sets our West Virginia resort apart is our ability to customize your experience by providing lodging and a wide selection of activities to choose from all on one premises. From the highest peaks to the lowest rushing river valleys, a world of adventure is at your command without ever leaving the comfort of our resort.

We have years of experience with customized programs. Whether you want to create a fun and family-friendly atmosphere or you want to focus on activities that improve teamwork skills, we can personalize our programs specifically for your group.

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Mission trips to West Virginia

If you’re planning a mission trip to West Virginia, be sure to incorporate a whitewater
rafting adventure down the second oldest river in the world, the New River.
Whether you choose to start your mission adventure with a team-building
experience or use it as a reward for a job well done, our half-day New River
Gorge raft trip can fit into most any schedule. Give us a call. We have special discounts for these groups and can direct you to agencies that assist with mission work in our area.

 

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Uplift the members of your church with a revitalizing and strengthening fellowship trip. Choose anything from a half-day adventure to a multi-day retreat; the opportunities are endless. This is the perfect chance to create a bond with your group as well as promoting unity within your church. Contact us.

 


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West Virginia Venturing Adventures

They say idle hands are the devil's playground. So come play on our playground and leave the idle life behind! Underfunded communities around the country are implementing venturing programs for their youth every day in the United States. When kids do not have anything positive to keep them busy, they end up doing less productive things with their time.

While many teenagers spend their summers glued to the TV, watching athletes and adventurers, teenagers in Venturing programs live the exhilarating adventure first-hand. ACE Adventure Resort offers lodging and activities ranging from white water rafting to zip line tours all on one premises.

The pivotal teenage years are when young people figure out who they really are and the adults they will soon become. By spending the summer developing social and communication skills to succeed in our competitive world, participants in Venturing programs socialize with their peers, make new friends, and learn the skills necessary for effective teamwork.

And because they are not sitting on the couch all summer, kids reap the benefits of physical fitness, getting the fresh air and exercise necessary for a healthy lifestyle.

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To learn more about our program please do not hesitate to give us a call or to contact us

 

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There are many reasons why venturing programs choose our 1,500-acre mountain hideaway for their trips, but perhaps the most prevalent reasons are: the convenience of our West Virginia resort, the abundance of outdoor activities, and the ability to customize their itineraries for their groups.

Offering lodging and numerous adventure attractions all in one facility is why many people choose us over any other resort. It's nice to not have to worry about renting a car to go somewhere or finding transportation to get to the attractions that you would like to experience. Choose the lodging style that suits your needs whether that's tents or our indoor facilities. And when you are ready to get your day started activities are all within your reach.

Whether your group would like to try mountain biking or outdoor adventure rafting ACE is your source for thrilling adventure through West Virginia's wilderness. Some of the other activities that we offer include: paintball, kayaking, canopy tours, and rock climbing. We are the best location for experiencing an unforgettable outdoor adventure.

We work with you to create a schedule of programs for your group that is geared to accomplish the specific goals that you would like to accomplish. The choice is entirely up to you, whether you want to focus on programs that you feel will build personal growth and/or leadership skills, you are able to make this decision. To learn how we can assist you with choosing the right programs for your group contact us for more information.

 


 

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West Virginia Girl Scout Adventures

While some girls may be content to hang at the mall and lay by the pool, the Girl Scouts are about learning new things and challenging girls to become responsible and independent. The outdoors does just that. Scouts at ACE have the opportunity to experience the wilderness like never seen before while earning badges, participating in service projects and other activities. Scouts at ACE work on their team skills, learn how to become leaders, make new friends, and leave with memorable experiences that will last them for a lifetime.

The friendships that they make and the lessons that they learn during their stay with us play a role in their futures. Through the goals that you set out for them and the team effort that they use to complete their programs they learn the skills needed to thrive and excel. Social skills, team work skills, leadership skills, and mental toughness can all be acquired just with one trip down to our resort. At ACE we are happy to play a role in the success of these young women and during your stay with us we will treat your children as if they were our own.

There are a wide variety of activities that will keep your scouts active and having fun. From whitewater rafting to canopy tours you can find a world of adventure all in one location. There are no worries about transporting your scouts from place to place to enjoy the activities that you want to participate in. Choose from a wide variety of attractions that will keep you on your toes without the thought of leaving the comfort of our West Virginia resort.

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To learn more about our program please do not hesitate to give us a call or to contact us

 

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The ACE adventures ensure that you will take priceless memories out of the mountains and the New River Gorge when you leave. But what will you put back in? Your scout troop can help rebuild the mountain by dedicating a small part of your summer to service. From river cleanup to trail revitalization, these efforts ensure that the wilderness will remain as pristine and inspiring as you left it.

If our program catches your eye contact us for more information. We are readily available to answer any questions that you have and at your request can provide you with ideas for a program that would be preferable for your group's specific goals.

 


 

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West Virginia Boy Scout Adventures

While many would be content spending the summer enjoying the natural beauty surrounding this West Virginia resort, scouts won't be simply lounging in the sun—its just not the Boy Scout way! Exploring the New River through whitewater rafting, scaling rocky terrain and other outdoor pursuits, Boy Scouts can earn merit badges in a unique setting, all for an affordable price.

Scout Catalog

ACE Boy Scout GuideFlip through our Scout catalog.

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Non-Profit Price Sheet

 

Merit Badge Programs

The Merit Badge Programs we offer are designed to put your scout face to face with the might and wisdom of the wild. These are experiences your young adventurer will never forget, all while ensuring that they learn the skills required by The Boy Scouts of America.

Service Projects

Outdoor adventuring ensures that you will take priceless memories out of the mountains and the New River Gorge when you leave. But what will you put back in? Your scout troop can help rebuild the mountain by dedicating a small part of your summer to service. From river cleanup to trail revitalization, these efforts ensure that the wilderness will remain as pristine and inspiring as you left it.

More information can be found at www.usscouts.org.

To learn more about our program please do not hesitate to give us a call or to contact us

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In wilderness survival training, scouts are taught to be economical with supplies and use every part of their limited resources to their disposal. The Summit Bechtel Reserve, home of the 2013 National Jamboree and the Scouts newest high adventure camp, provides scouts with facilities and outdoor adventures on a massive 10,000-acre property. But all of the adventures that scouts have the option of participating in--white water rafting, zip line tours, mountain biking and more—are also available just minutes down the trail from The Summit.

By staying with ACE, scouts can participate in the adventures that the National Scout Jamboree offers for much less. ACE Adventure Resort is proud to play a role in shaping youth into leaders, providing them with an authentic adventurous outdoors experience, and bringing groups together, just as the Scouts have taught us.

Because scouting is all about shaping world leaders and action-oriented adults, contact us with all of your ideas and thoughts for your perfect summer. We'll customize your itinerary and create the best action plan for you and your group.

Whitewater Safety Orientation Video


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ACE West Virginia Boy Scout Merit Badge Programs

Whitewater Merit Badge

Boy Scout Whitewater Merit Badge

Boy Scout TripsThis is the best Whitewater Merit Badge around! Combine two different learning experiences on two very different stretches of whitewater.

Day 1: We'll challenge the Upper New River (easier whitewater) in our high-performance inflatable kayaks. River reading, scouting rapids, whitewater paddling techniques and self-rescue will be the topics of the day.

Day 2: The grand finale will be spent rafting the big water of the Lower New River (moderate to challenging whitewater). The group must apply the skills acquired from day one to be a finely tuned whitewater rafting team on day two. There is a guide in every raft.

  • Prerequisites include: Canoe or Kayak Merit Badge, CPR and First Aid.
  • We cover the entire whitewater skills requirements listed on www.meritbadge.com from #4 on (1-3 are covered with CPR, First Aid and Canoe or Kayak Merit Badge).
  • Instructors, equipment and two lunches are included.

Whitewater Merit Badge Requirements:

Canoeing or kayaking through whitewater rapids can be a thrilling experience. Safe whitewater fun requires each participant to understand the the equipment and techniques and to have a firm respect for the power of nature's waterways.

Requirements

  1. Do the following:
    1. Review with your counselor the first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while working on the Whitewater merit badge, including hypothermia, heat reactions, dehydration, insect stings, blisters, bruises, cuts, and shoulder dislocation.
    2. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a person. Explain how such conditions are recognized.
    3. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Review and compare BSA Safety Afloat and the American Whitewater safety guidelines and demonstrate your understanding of these principles by answering questions from your counselor.
    2. Identify and explain the use and importance of safety equipment on moving water. Include in your explanation a discussion about throw ropes, whistles, and how to choose and properly fit PFDs (personal flotation devices) and helmets.
  3. Before doing requirements 4 through 13, earn the Canoeing merit badge if you will be using a canoe to earn this merit badge. If you will be using a kayak, earn the Kayaking BSA Award.
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. If you are completing these requirements as a tandem canoeist, demonstrate basic canoe-handling skills by completing the Scout gate test within 160 seconds while paddling tandem with a buddy. Then demonstrate the following strokes: cross forward, cross draw, bow pry, Duffek, high brace, and low brace.
    2. If you are completing these requirements as a solo canoeist, demonstrate basic solo canoe-handling skills by completing the Scout gate test within 160 seconds. Then demonstrate the following strokes: cross forward, cross draw, stern pry, Duffek, high brace, and low brace.
    3. If you are using a kayak to complete these requirements, demonstrate basic kayak-handling skills by completing the Scout gate test within 160 seconds. Demonstrate the following strokes: Duffek, high brace, low brace, and sculling draw. Then do the following:
      1. Move the kayak forward in a reasonably straight line for 10 yards.
      2. Move the kayak sideways to the right and to the left.
      3. Pivot 360 degrees to the right and left.
      4. Stop the kayak.
  5. Do the following:
    1. Explain the importance of scouting before committing to running a rapid, and discuss good judgment when evaluating a stretch of river or a particular rapid.
    2. Explain the terms downstream V, riffle, strainer, eddy, eddy line, pillow, ledge, bend, shallows, falls, low-head dam, current, rock, drop, horizon line, wave, standing wave, hydraulic, and sleeper.
    3. Explain how to scout and read a river while ashore and while afloat, and discuss the importance of hazard recognition.
    4. Demonstrate your ability to read the river where you are practicing and demonstrating your whitewater skills.
  6. Explain the International Scale of River Difficulty and apply the scale to the stretch of river where you are practicing and demonstrating your whitewater skills. Identify the specific characteristics of the river that are factors in your classification according to the International Scale.
  7. Explain the importance of communication during every whitewater outing. Explain and then demonstrate using the following river signals: "Run right," "Run left," "Run down the center," "Stop," "Are you OK?" and "Help!"
  8. Do the following:
    1. Explain the differences between flatwater and whitewater canoes. Identify the different materials used in modern whitewater canoe construction and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
    2. Describe the various types of kayaks and how they differ in design, materials, and purpose.
    3. Identify the advantages and special uses for kayaks and decked canoes in moving water.
    4. Discuss the construction, safety, and functional features of paddles used in whitewater activities.
  9. Discuss the personal and group equipment necessary for a safe whitewater outing and how and why it is used. Explain how to pack and protect these items.
  10. Wearing the proper personal flotation device (PFD) and being appropriately dressed for the weather and water conditions, perform the following skills in moving water in a properly equipped whitewater craft of your choice (tandem canoe, solo canoe, or solo kayak). If a tandem canoe is used, the skills must be demonstrated from both the bow and stern positions.
    1. Launch and land.
    2. Paddle forward in a straight line.
    3. Backpaddle.
    4. Sideslip, both sides.
    5. Ferry upstream and downstream.
    6. Eddy turn.
    7. Peel out.
  11. Explain and demonstrate:
    1. Self-rescue and procedures when capsized in moving water, including a wet exit if necessary
    2. Safe rescue of others in various whitewater situations using a throw rope
    3. Portaging—when and how to do it
    4. The whitewater buddy system using at least three persons and three craft
  12. Discuss the use of inflatable rafts on moving water. In your discussion, explain the special safety precautions that should be taken when using an inflatable raft and the risks of "tubing" on moving water.
  13. Participate in a whitewater trip using either a canoe or kayak on a Class I or Class II river. Help to prepare a written plan, specifying the route, schedule, equipment, safety precautions, and emergency procedures. Determine local rules and obtain permission from landowners and land managers in advance. Explain what steps you have taken to comply with BSA Safety Afloat and the American Whitewater safety guidelines. Execute the plan with others.

 

Climbing Merit Badge

Boy Scout Climbing Merit Badge

Rock ClimbingOur comprehensive "ground school" emphasizes the techniques required to be a safe, trustworthy top rope climber and belayer. Over the course of two days, the class covers: equipment, knots, anchor systems, belay techniques, climbing movement, and most importantly, safety. This intensive curriculum requires attention and an eagerness to learn. Upon completion, you should understand and have demonstrated the requirements for the Climbing Merit Badge. Working knowledge of knots and ropes is required.

  • Prerequisites include: CPR and First Aid.
  • We cover all climbing requirement skills listed on www.meritbadge.com from #4 on (1-3 are covered with CPR and First Aid).
  • Instructors, equipment and two lunches are included.

Climbing Merit Badge Requirements:

Climbing is not a sport that requires tremendous muscular strength; it demands mental toughness and the willingness to practice hard to master a set of skills. The adventure of climbing can also provide a new way to enjoy the outdoors.

Requirements

    1. Do the following:

        a. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in climbing and rappelling activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
        b. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur during climbing activities, including heat and cold reactions, dehydration, stopped breathing, sprains, abrasions, fractures, rope burns, blisters, snakebite, and insect bites or stings.
        c. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person.

    2.) Learn the Leave No Trace principles and Outdoor Code, and explain what they mean.

    3.) Present yourself properly dressed for belaying, climbing, and rappelling (i.e., appropriate clothing, footwear, and a helmet; rappellers can also wear gloves).

    4.) Location. Do the following:

        a.) Explain how the difficulty of climbs is classified, and apply classifications to the rock faces or walls where you will demonstrate your climbing skills.
        b.) Explain the following: top-rope climbing, lead climbing, and bouldering.
        c.) Evaluate the safety of a particular climbing area. Consider weather, visibility, the condition of the climbing surface, and any other environmental hazards.
        d.) Determine how to summon aid to the climbing area in case of an emergency.

    5.) Verbal signals. Explain the importance of using verbal signals during every climb and rappel, and while bouldering. With the help of the merit badge counselor or another Scout, demonstrate the verbal signals used by each of the following:

        a.) Climbers
        b.) Rappellers
        c.) Belayers
        d.) Boulderers and their spotters

    6.) Rope. Do the following:

        a.) Describe the kinds of rope acceptable for use in climbing and rappelling.
        b.) Show how to examine a rope for signs of wear or damage.
        c.) Discuss ways to prevent a rope from being damaged.
        d.) Explain when and how a rope should be retired.
        e.) Properly coil a rope.

    7.) Knots. Demonstrate the ability to tie each of the following knots. Give at least one example of how each knot is used in belaying, climbing, or rappelling.

        a.) Figure eight on a bight
        b.) Figure eight follow-through
        c.) Water knot
        d.) Double fisherman's knot (grapevine knot)
        e.) Safety knot

    8.) Harnesses. Correctly put on at least ONE of the following:

        a.) Commercially made climbing harness
        b.) Tied harness

    9.) Belaying. Do the following:

        a.) Explain the importance of belaying climbers and rappellers and when it is necessary.
        b.) Belay three different climbers ascending a rock face or climbing wall.
        c.) Belay three different rappellers descending a rock face or climbing wall using a top rope.

    10.) Climbing. Do the following:

        a.) Show the correct way to directly tie into a belay rope.
        b.) Climb at least three different routes on a rock face or climbing wall, demonstrating good technique and using verbal signals with a belayer.

    11.) Rappelling. Do the following:

        a.) Using a carabiner and a rappel device, secure your climbing harness to a rappel rope.
        b.) Tie in to a belay rope set up to protect rappellers.
        c.) Rappel down three different rock faces or three rappel routes on a climbing wall. Use verbal signals to communicate with a belayer, and demonstrate good rappelling technique.

    12.) Demonstrate ways to store rope, hardware, and other gear used for climbing, rappelling, and belaying.

Horsemanship Merit Badge


Boy Scout Horsemanship Merit Badge

In addition to learning how to safely ride and care for horses, Scouts who earn this merit badge will gain an understanding of the instincts and behaviors of horses and humane and effective methods for training horses.


Boy Scout Horsemanship Merit Badge Requirements   

1.) Do the following:

        a.) Describe the safety precautions you should take when handling and caring for a horse.
        b.) Describe the fire safety precautions you should take in a barn and around horses.

2.) Name the 15 main parts of a horse.

3.) Name four breeds of horses. Explain the special features for which each breed is known.   

4.) Describe the symptoms of colic. Name and describe four other horse health problems.
   
5.) Explain what conformation is and why it is important. Explain the difference between lameness and unsoundness.
   
6.) Explain the importance of hoof care and why a horse might need to wear shoes.   

7.)Demonstrate how to groom a horse, including picking hooves and caring for a horse after a ride.
   
8.)Explain how to determine what and how much to feed a horse and why the amount and kind of feed are changed according to the activity level and the breed of horse.
   
9.) Do the following:
       
        a.) Name 10 parts of the saddle and bridle that you will use, and explain how to care for this equipment.
        b.) Show how to properly saddle and bridle a horse.
        c.) Demonstrate how to safely mount and dismount a horse.
   
10.) Explain and demonstrate how to approach and lead a horse safely from a stall, corral, or field and how to tie the horse securely.
   
11.) On level ground, continuously do the following movements after safely mounting the horse. Do them correctly, at ease, and in harmony with the horse.
       
        a.) Walk the horse in a straight line for 60 feet.
        b.) Walk the horse in a half-circle of not more than 16 feet in radius.
        c.) Trot or jog the horse in a straight line for 60 feet.
        d.) Trot or jog the horse in a half-circle of not more than 30 feet in radius.
        e.) Halt straight.
        f.) Back up straight four paces.
        g.) Halt and dismount.

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TEAM BUILDING & Adventures for Groups

Team Building and Adventures for Groups – also known as T.A.G. – is ACE’s fully-customizable program that is set in a unique learning environment – the great outdoors – to engage groups and energize them into action unlike any other experience. It’s a structured environment where each person can discover his or her potential, learn to work with one another and prepare to face real world challenges.

While every group that comes to ACE enjoys fresh mountain air, beautiful vistas and a myriad of activities, everyone has different needs. Whatever you’re looking to accomplish, ACE can custom design a retreat especially for you. All of our programs can be adapted as necessary to meet your group’s goals - to offer appropriate opportunities for learning, personal growth and positive change.  

To start, each program is built around a framework of safety both physically and mentally for every individual. From there, our programs and activities always have one theme in common - experiencing an outrageously good time!

We invite you to learn more about ACE and what we can help you achieve. Give us a call to discuss the possibilities.

boy-scouts-groups

From Chief Sitting Bull to Jack London to Bear Grylls, people across many faiths, generations and walks of life have believed the wilderness holds a primal role in molding a young man. The Boy Scouts of America have been creating teachable moments for youth to learn the ways of the outdoors for generations. But it isn't all double hitch knots and locating the North Star. Scouts are taught to show courage, preparedness and service to their communities. At ACE Adventure Resort, a premier West Virginia vacation destination, the most exciting aspects of outdoor adventure come to life on the banks of the New River Gorge.

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girl-scout-groups

While you may know the Girl Scouts for selling cookies, the Girl Scouts of America have a long, proud tradition of offering sugar AND spice as gutty, thrill-seeking adventurers. Many of ACE Adventure Resort's professional guides were once girl scouts themselves, giving them unique insight as to what it takes to build an effective outdoor program. Through leadership, direction, organization and action, these guides blaze a trail as the perfect role models for your young women.

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venturing-groups

Venturing programs reach out to youth at one of the most critical stages of life, the time period where we experience change and grow into young adults. Created by the Boy Scouts of America, venturing is a development program for young men and women ages 14 to 20 years old. The program features a unique relationship between participants, adult sponsors, and organizations within their communities.

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faith-based-groups

Faith-based Groups. George Washington Carver once compared nature to God's broadcasting station "through which He speaks to us every hour, if we only will tune in." By bringing your group to the wilderness to experience the majesty of God's creation, you bring them to a new house of worship. Enjoying the power of mighty rivers through white water rafting or the beauty of the light shining through the trees on a canopy tour, you see the power of God firsthand.

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corporate-group

Corporate Groups. At the office, you are the king of the carpool lane, Mr. shirt-and-tie, all business from sun up to sun down. Scale a cliff? You won't even take a 45-minute lunch break. But at ACE Adventure Resort, you are a wilderness warrior, flying down zip lines as fast as the wind, navigating white-water rapids like an experienced racecar driver. By unlocking the hidden talents of your team and joining together to take a walk on the wild side, you will unlock hidden potential and camaraderie you never knew existed. And it all starts with a call to ACE.

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non-profit-groups

Non-Profits are kind of like superheroes. When government and big business abandon the little guy, these super Samaritans swoop in and provide much-needed services. So what better bonding for these caped caregivers than flying on a zip line tours or scaling tall cliffs in a single bound?

With over 30 years of providing exceptional adventure vacations, ACE has become the leader in offering visitors thrilling and exciting experiences for non-profit groups. Working with a tight budget? No problem, we can custom design a program specific to your group's individual needs while staying within an affordable price range. We know you love your job as a member of a non-profit. Our adventure specialists love their jobs too so sharing a little slice of our world with you is our passion. That's why at ACE, you can be whatever you want to be. We ensure that by the time you leave, you are no longer a marketing director or a fundraising coordinator. You are an adventurer, with an improved sense of gusto and a mission to take on the world.

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public-safety-groups

Public Safety Groups. Kicking in doors, getting shot at, getting scalded, cuffing suspects and rescuing the innocent may seem like dangerous pursuits in stressful situations. But for America's military, police and fire officials, it's a slow Tuesday. For these danger junkies, sitting by the pool all day and grabbing a tan just won't cut it. At Ace Adventure Resorts, we get it. We know that the excitement of rock climbing and white water rafting can feel like a day at the beach when putting yourself in harm's way is just part of your everyday.

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school-groups

School Groups. Some things you just can't learn in a classroom. From Thoreau to Jefferson to Emerson, some of the world's foremost thinkers have written of the power of nature to inspire, shape and change those who enter and embrace it. But this is no soothing nature walk. At Ace Adventure Resort, we specialize in intersecting the majesty of nature with the physicality and team building of a great field trip. Our adventure vacation center offers many activities that will help bring even the most disparate classrooms together.

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Corporate White Water Rafting

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GROUP OVERVIEW

West Virginia Corporate Adventures

As one of the premier West Virginia resorts, we offer custom programs designed specifically to bring your group together. Over three decades of experience working with organizations to develop programs, ice breakers and other adventure games have given us a unique sense of how to get even the most divided office groups crossing boundaries and opening new doors.

Getting to know one another outside of the workplace is the perfect way to break the ice or strengthen teams in need of improvement. Sharing an exhilarating outdoor adventure together enables you to build an understanding of one another, which improves your ability to work together as a team. Somewhere between watching teammates solve problems, navigate physical and mental obstacles and taking in the wide, West Virginia sky, all the stress of deadlines, meetings and memos melts away and all that is left is a group of people ready to get to know each other a little better.

Our West Virginia resort specializes in programs for groups of all sizes. ACE representatives will help you to choose the best trip for your group by considering the following:

  • What are your goals for this trip?
  • What is your budget?
  • What is the size of your group?
  • Do you want your event to be developmental?
  • Do you prefer your trip to be recreational, or a combination of both?
  • Do you have liability concerns?
  • What time period do you have in mind for your event?

Non-Profit Price Sheet

To learn more about our program please do not hesitate to give us a call or to contact us

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MORE INFO

At ACE there is a plethora of outdoor adventures that you can choose from for your corporate retreats and team building activities. Some of the thrilling activities that we offer include zip line tours, mountain biking, white water rafting and much more. What you decide to choose for your team is entirely up to you and when you speak with us we offer you the guidance to construct the perfect program of activities that will suit your group the best.

So get out here, and see how trading your suit for a safety harness can change a sales team, management staff or department forever!

 


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Outdoor Adventures in West Virginia

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GROUP OVERVIEW

Non-Profit West Virginia Adventures

After the long days and sleepless nights fighting to make the world a better place, your non-profit team may want to relax under the stars, and enjoy the majesty of the great outdoors. We can do that. But the thrill-seekers looking for a rush, may want to take advantage of a wide range of activities--white water rafting, rock climbing, ziplining. We can do that too! What sets our West Virginia resort apart is our ability to customize your experience by providing lodging and a wide selection of activities to choose from all on one premises. From the highest peaks to the lowest rushing river vallies, a world of adventure is at your command without ever leaving the comfort of our resort.
We have years of experience with customized programs for youth groups, athletic teams, school programs, and YMCA groups. At ACE, we understand that every team is looking for something different. Whether you want to create a family atmosphere or you would like to focus on activities that improve teamwork skills, we can personalize our programs specifically for your group.
 

To learn more about our program please do not hesitate to give us a call or to contact us.

 

MORE INFO

At ACE there is a plethora of outdoor adventures that you can choose from for your non-profit retreats and team building activities. Some of the thrilling activities that we offer include zip line tours, mountain biking, white water rafting and much more. What you decide to choose for your team is entirely up to you and when you speak with us we offer you the guidance to construct the perfect program of activities that will suit your group the best.

So get out here, and see how trading your indoor classroom for an outdoor classroom with a safety harness can change a team, management staff or department forever!

 


 



Outdoor Learning

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GROUP OVERVIEW

Junior High and High School West Virginia Adventures


We all know it’s true – getting kids outside is more challenging than ever. With cell phone, computer and television screen-times skyrocketing, getting friends together for a pick-up game of kickball or overnight camping adventure in the backyard are more of an anomaly than the norm.

That’s where ACE comes in. We are experts on the great outdoors. And we sure know how to have fun and inspire kids to want more – more fresh air, more time with friends, more “aha” moments! Teachers who have used our program know that a day spent with ACE develops important social skills, inspires creative problem solving and helps their students to see the world through new “glasses.”

If you’re wondering how our program works, there are lots of ways groups use us to accomplish goals. Say you want to:Jumping Into The New River
  • Develop concepts such as communication, trust, problem solving and teamwork in an environment that treats everyone equally
  • “Make the great connection” between your classroom lesson and what it really means to live on this planet and be a part of its future
  • Reward you your students’ achievements with a new experience that will stick with them for the rest of their lives
We know how to make this happen. Our outdoor adventure program for kids has proven successful for teachers all over the east coast. So join us in creating a generation of happier, healthier kids with more awareness and connection to themselves and the world around them.

“We just got back from an amazing trip at ACE where we enjoyed zip lining and rafting with a group of high school freshman. I was so comfortable with our students being in the hands of these guides. Their patience, knowledge and personalities made for a stress free and enjoyable trip. We will be using ACE for many years in the future!”

Christie K. - Trip Advisor
Dayton, OH


Environmental Education Programs

“I hear and I forget… I see and I remember… I do and I understand.”
-Confucius

Famous scientific researchers such as Jacques Cousteau and Charles Darwin knew first-hand that when you become aware of your environment… by touching it, seeing it, and interacting with it, so much more can be learned. It has the power to transform passive awareness into responsible action-takers.

Here in West Virginia, the 53-mile New River Gorge National River, adjoining our 1,500-acre Adventure Resort, is home to one of the most diverse biospheres in the world. From the lush, riparian ecosystem of the river and its banks up to the craggy canyon rim environment, the Gorge is as diverse as it is complex. Each of our life science field trip curriculums explores the natural elements of this environment, how humans impact these systems and how we encourage contribution to its protection.

ACE Outdoor Adventure Program Curriculum

Hydrology - Whitewater Rafting
Ecology - Zip Lining
Geology - Rock Climbing

Non-Profit Price Sheet

To learn more about our program please do not hesitate to give us a call or to contact us

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MORE INFO

At ACE there is a plethora of outdoor adventures that you can choose from for your schools retreats and team building activities. Some of the thrilling activities that we offer include zip line tours, mountain biking, white water rafting and much more. What you decide to choose for your team is entirely up to you and when you speak with us we offer you the guidance to construct the perfect program of activities that will suit your group the best.

So get out here, and see how trading your classroom for a safety harness can change a team, management staff or department forever!

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Zip Line

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GROUP OVERVIEW

Public Safety: Military - Policeman – Firefighters

Our adventure vacation packages offer the pulse-pounding thrill of shooting down a zipline at high speeds overlooking the forest floor hundreds of feet below on our zip line tours, swinging across jagged cliffs to scale a peak and rocketing down real rapids on our many white water rafting trips. From watching the kids enjoy games and activities by the lodge to getting into some high-flying danger with our outdoor activities, your trip can be as high-octane or as low-key as you wish. With customized, adventurous options completely tailored to your specifications, you can relax your way.

Non-Profit Price Sheet

To learn more about our program please do not hesitate to give us a call or to contact us

Plan Your Trip

 

MORE INFO

At ACE there is a plethora of outdoor adventures that you can choose from for your teams retreats and team building activities. Some of the thrilling activities that we offer include zip line tours, mountain biking, white water rafting and much more. What you decide to choose for your team is entirely up to you and when you speak with us we offer you the guidance to construct the perfect program of activities that will suit your group the best.

So get out here, and see how trading your suit for a safety harness can change a team, management staff or department forever!

ACE is also the perfect place to bring your teams families along for a truely unique networking opportunity.

 


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